Evert's

Everti, a Canadian company that sells only titanium bicycles, has just announced it’s first foray into production 29″ers with the aptly named “29R” hardtail. Everti was founded in 2000 by Kurt Knock and has been producing stock and custom titanium bicycles built in Taiwan since that time.

This model has been in the works for awhile. Knock says, ” We have spent the last 12
months working on this design to make sure we got all the bugs out since 29′ers are not as simple to build or design as their 26″ wheel cousins.”

Everti

Kurt Knock goes on to describe the frame for us as follows: “Our 3/2.5 Ti frame features double butted top and seat tubes while the rest of the frame is straight gauge. The down tube is oversized and ovalized at the head tube and bottom bracket for added strength. Our 29R has a longer head tube than most of our competitors to help distributed the added stress that the longer fork creates. Also our
mini-gusset at the head tube/down tube junction is designed to distribute the stress from this area without causing a focused stress point like most other gussets do. “

Everti

It’s easy to see in the image above what he means about the head tube and gusset. It should prove to be a smart move, since another thing the longer head tube should help do is to prevent torsional flex in the front triangle. Another interesting feature of the “29R” is its use of a full run cable housing. Kurt says it helps keep the cables running smoothly where they hail from in British Columbia.

Everti Bottom bracket area

The frame weighs 1500 grams in a medium size. The complete bike, as pictured above weighs 23.3 lbs. The frames are offered in medium, large, and extra large to fit a size range of people from approximately 5’8″ to 6’4″. For an extra $200.00 a frame can be custom made to fit someone outside of this range.

Everti

Production frames sell for $1595 USD. Complete bikes are available and as an example the one in the photo is $3725. For more information on the “29R” model and to see the geometry chart, click here.

Editors Note: Thanks to Kurt Knock for providing the images and information used in this post.